Mar 242011
 

Wow!  Impressive picture!  Unfortunately, we didn’t get to see any clear views of the super moon as is came over the horizon.   That’s OK though, when you have these types of photos to enjoy at your disposal, there was no need.

Image of the Day: 'supermoon' puts other full moons to shame

We hope you didn’t miss that huge moon on Saturday…but if you did, don’t fret. Just browse the gallery below for some spectacular shots of the "largest" full moon since 1993.

Image of the Day: ‘supermoon’ puts other full moons to shame
Megan Wollerton
Wed, 23 Mar 2011 14:00:00 GMT

Sep 022010
 

 

It’s a new week and I’ve got a new set of tips to improve your photography. This week’s tips focus on planning and decision making while taking your shots…. Eventually it will feel like second nature and you won’t even be aware of the process, until then… keep these tips in mind.

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1. Daydream

Yes, that’s right keep dreaming about your shot. Pre-Visualize in your mind what it will look like and walk through the steps you need to take to get it. This is a shot I thought about for several weeks before finally setting it up and taking it. With only one camera, I often feel like I’m constantly juggling lenses!

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2. Use wide lens

Try to use wide lenses for landscape shots when you want to create an impact of size. You can use a wide range of lenses to shoot landscapes but the vistas are amazing if you shoot with the widest lens possible because they give you a bigger angle of view.

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3. Sharpen Your Subjects

Keep your main subjects sharp. Sharp details in the image truly draw the viewers’ eyes towards the subject. Use your tripod in low light conditions to make sharp pictures. Try to make use of the new sharpening effect in Adobe Camera RAW. It does a great job and has improved from previous versions.

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4. Keep it Clean

A background makes or breaks your shot so be sure to think carefully about the how you place your subject. Keep the background clean, simple and clutter free. Think about where the viewer should be focused….

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5. You Can’t Have Too Many Clouds

Use fluffy white clouds on a blue sky to produce dramatic skies. Is it overcast with too many clouds to see the sky? The sky is now a giant soft box. This is the time to shoot portraits or waterfalls and streams with a motion blur effect.

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6. Behind Every Great Shot is the Sun

Stand with the sun at your back and the light of the sun falling on your subject. Unless you are making artistic pictures always try to keep the sun behind you.

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7. Light Trails

Enhance your dawn and night urban shots with light trails. Use vehicles or any other moving lights to add interest, mood, and drama. Light trails almost always makes the shot interesting (learn: how to shoot light trails).

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8. Silhouettes

The key is an uncluttered, lit background. Simply place your subject in the foreground so that you have clean, sharp lines and go for it. Play with placement and angles to make awesome silhouettes (learn: how to shoot Silhouettes).

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9. Top to Bottom

Look straight up. Look straight down. Now examine everything in between. There are great shots from every vantage point, including an unexpected angle. Sometimes we focus so much on the obvious shot that we miss something special just a heartbeat away.

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10. And finally… It’s a Camera not a Machine Gun

Unless you are taking action shots or a time lapse series, try to reduce the number of shots. Don’t just fire away hoping for something good to appear during editing. Think, move, and adjust your framing before you click the shutter. You’ll develop better instincts and save hours of time editing those hundreds of extra images.

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Check out these links to follow the whole series

Amar Ramesh is an emerging photographer from Redmond WA, USA….Photography, to him is a passion with infinite opportunities and he loves to share the lessons and tips that he learned with others….Please visit his Facebook Page for more….He is also in Flickr|Twitter|Portfolio.

Post from: Digital Photography School – Photography Tips.

dpsbook.png

10 Quick and Easy Tips to improve your Photography

10 Quick and Easy Tips to improve your Photography
Guest Contributor
Tue, 31 Aug 2010 14:11:12 GMT

Jul 262010
 

Part 2 of the night shots I took on our road trip.  Here’s another one from Mesa Verde:

897012245_MRZui-M[1]

Description:  A shot of the evening sky overlooking the restaurant at the Far View Lodge.
Camera: Canon D90 w/ 18-105 lens
Method: 2 min exposure, f/10 
Date: July 6th, 2010
Comment: Not much to complain about on this one.  I was really just playing around here, and got a little lucky.

Jul 262010
 

Part 2 of the night shots I took on our road trip.  Here’s another one from Mesa Verde:

897012245_MRZui-M[1]

Description:  A shot of the evening sky overlooking the restaurant at the Far View Lodge.
Camera: Canon D90 w/ 18-105 lens
Method: 2 min exposure, f/10 
Date: July 6th, 2010
Comment: Not much to complain about on this one.  I was really just playing around here, and got a little lucky.

Jul 252010
 

We recently took a road trip down through the south end of the state for our 2-hour anniversary. 

During our stay in Mesa Verde, I tried my hand at a little night photography.

897012190_5Nffx-M[1]

Description:  The night sky out of our room at the Far View Lodge
Camera: Canon D90 w/ 18-105 lens
Method: 30 minute exposure, f/5.6, ISO 100 
Date: July 6th, 2010
Comment: Not bad for my first attempt as at a long exposure shot.  Just a tad grainy, will have to work on that.

Jul 242010
 

Today I went and visited my friend Chris, his wife Krista, and two sons Aiden and Ryder.  Aiden is only 1 and half or so, and Ryder is only 11 weeks.  We hasn’t seen them since Ryder was born, so it was a good chance to visit the new addition to the Wilper clan.

Chris and Krista bought a new house last year further up the mountain from their old house in Coal Creek Canyon.  This time they upsized to a bigger house and an 8 acre lot that included the peak of a small mountain!  While we were there we went with Chris for his first visit to the peak.  HE always figured it would have a great view, and hoped to be able to see downtown Denver.

After a quick climb (20-30 minutes) we reached the peak.  Yes it had a great view, and yes you could see not only downtown Denver, and even downtown Boulder!:

http://toddnkaren.smugmug.com/photos/946300475_6XdBG-L.jpg

 

After getting slightly lost on the way back down, we made our way out to the road that leads to his house.   A short walk up down the road found us back at his house.

Since they have such a fantastic view from their back patio,  I figured it would be a good place to setup the tripod and camera to grab some time lapse shots while we were eating dinner.

I wasn’t too sure how this would turn out as it was pointing into the sun, and I’m still trying to get the exposures correct as it start to get dark, not to mention trying to keep lens flares to a minimum.

After a little touch up, I found that the balance came out well, and the lens flare made for a cool effect to the sun!:

Thanks Chris a Krista for a fun evening hanging out with you guys!

Jul 222010
 

 

Pole-Star-Light-TrailsAnd before those of you in the Southern Hemisphere jump all over the title, with its clear Northern Hemisphere slant, don’t worry, I’ll be talking about the Southern Cross (Crux) as well.  There just wasn’t room in the title to fit in all of that.

Let’s start off with the ‘why’ and then move to the how.  For those of you well versed in astronomy this may all seem very simple to you and you’re welcome to skip right over.  But as I’ve traveled I’ve been amazed at how many people, while sitting around a campfire or on a beach, can’t find the North Star or Southern Cross.  I’ll admit, for most people, it doesn’t matter.  They just like seeing stars overhead, making up constellations and looking for shooting stars.  And that fine.  But if you are looking to take pictures of the night sky, it can be helpful to find either the North Star (Polaris) or Southern Cross.

The reason is that it will tell you how light trails from the Earth’s rotation will show up in your picture.  Are you looking for streaks across the sky when using a long shutter speed or stacking photos?  Or do you want that cool circular effect?  It can be fun to play with different directions and foreground objects and unless you’re familiar with finding the right locations, it can be tricky.  First, some explanation.

A Pole Star is a star that sits near the point of rotation for the axis of the Earth directly above either pole.  In the case of the North Pole, it’s the North Star. In the case of the South Pole there currently is not a single star close in that is easy to spot with the naked eye, so the Southern Cross is often referenced.  Unless you are on the equator, you can only see one or the other (or very high up a mountain near the equator, like Mt. Kilimanjaro).  When you point a camera at either Polaris or the Crux and leave the shutter open for a while, you’ll get a swirled pattern as you see in the photo above (shot in Arches National Park, Utah, USA).  If you point the camera away from the pole, you’ll get more gradual curves depending on your location.  The photo at the bottom of this post was taken near the equator, in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, while pointing Southwest.

Speaking of location, let’s find the North Star.  It’s fairly simple and you only need to know one constellation, the Big Dipper or Ursa Major.  I usually reference this constellation rather than the Little Dipper (Ursa Minor), even though Polaris is part of the Little Dipper, because the Big Dipper has ‘brighter’ stars (I know I’m disturbing some astronomers out there with a few colloquial terms and I apologize).  Once you have found the Big Dipper, connect the dots from the bottom of the outside of the dipper (farthest from the handle) to the top of the outside of the dipper.  Now follow that line until you meet the next bright star.  That’s Polaris and it is at the tip of the handle of the Little Dipper.

Serengeti Star Trails As I have practically no experience finding the Southern Celestial Pole, I’m going to borrow from Wikipedia (this is where the astronomers can jump in and give some pointers (har har har)) “Since the southern sky lacks an easily visible pole star, Alpha and Gamma (known as Acrux and Gacrux respectively) are commonly used to mark south. Tracing a line from Gacrux to Acrux and extending it for approximately 4.5 times the distance between the 2 stars leads to a point close to the Southern Celestial Pole. Alternatively, if a line is constructed perpendicularly between Alpha Centauri and Beta Centauri, the point where the above mentioned line and this line intersect marks the Southern Celestial Pole. The two stars of Alpha and Beta Centauri are often referred to as the “Southern Pointers” or just “The Pointers”, allowing people to easily find the asterism of the Southern Cross or the constellation of Crux.”

A helpful reminder when finding either celestial pole is they are as far off the horizon, North or South, as you are from the equator. In other words, the photo at the top was taken in Utah at approximately 38.7°North Latitude, so the North Celestial Pole is 38.7° off the horizon to the North.  This is helpful for visualizing a trip in advance.  If you know your latitude, you can guesstimate what your star pattern will look like.

And that’s the how and why of finding either celestial pole.  Armed with that knowledge, and the DPS post 4 Steps to Creating Star Trails With Stacking Software, it’s time to head outside when the sun goes down and see what you can create!  Feel free to post some of your memorable star trail photos in the comments section.

PHOTO NOTES: The top photo is a stack of 36 images taken over 51 minutes. Each image is 75 seconds in duration shot at 16mm, ISO 1250 f/6.3. The second photo is one single image lasting 618 seconds, f/2.8, ISO 400, 16mm.

Post from: Digital Photography School – Photography Tips.

How To Find The North Star And Why You’d Want To
Peter West Carey
Thu, 22 Jul 2010 14:07:52 GMT

May 282010
 

WOW!  This is just amazing, my hat is off to Brad Kremer for this one. I won’t ruin it with my blabber, watch and enjoy!

Hayaku: A Time Lapse Journey Through Japan from Brad Kremer on Vimeo.

Hayaku: A time lapse journey through Japan.

Japan is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. This is my Japan. This is one of the many reasons why I love Japan. I shot this in many locations around Japan in the summer of 2009. Some of the location include Tokyo, Matsuyama, Imabari, Nagano, Gifu, and Ishizushisan.

I started this as a personal project to try and capture the beauty that I see in Japan. It started as just that…

But now that I have finished, I see it only as a beginning. This video, along with SAIJO MATSURI (www.vimeo.com/7458088) is just the start of a much larger project that I have now decided to do.

So I hope you enjoy this preview of what is to come in the future.

"Hayaku" definition: Hurry up

Camera: Canon 5DMKII

Additional equipment: Mumford Moco

Music:

Royksopp – Triumphant

The Album Leaf – Window

Feb 242010
 

Since just over a year ago when I decided to step up to a DSLR and buy a Nikon D90, which I absolutely love, I’ve become more and more appreciative of great photography.  I’m still learning to use Photoshop and Lightroom to turn my ‘snapshots’ into some dramatic photos worth showing off.

Digital Photography School just posted these awesome shots.  I really want to get this good some day.

Landscape photography can provide some of the most awe-inspiring photos out there. But doing it well is the key. Anyone can take a snapshot on their vacation, but it takes a talented photographer (a true artist!) to capture the scene. Lighting, angle, crop, lens, and post processing all play a part in the final image. Combining the various elements together is what makes these 25 landscape photos truly outstanding.

Winter Dusk and Angel's Landing Zion National Park by James Crotty

Winter Dusk and Angel’s Landing Zion National Park by James Crotty

Sunflower Moon 1 by Jim Crotty

Sunflower Moon 1 by Jim Crotty

Change of Direction by James Neeley

Change of Direction by James Neeley

Break in the Storm by James Neeley

Break in the Storm by James Neeley

 Mount Gould in Morning Light by James Neeley

Mount Gould in Morning Light by James Neeley

Rainier Alpenglow by Mike Dawson

Rainier Alpenglow by Mike Dawson

Rise against the storm by Michael Vincent Manalo

Rise against the storm by Michael Vincent Manalo

The Tree by Terry Shuck

The Tree by Terry Shuck

North Gateway Rock by Marcus Panek

North Gateway Rock by Marcus Panek

::HDR-Vertorama:: Shine On You!!! by Leonardo Riano

::HDR-Vertorama:: Shine On You!!! by Leonardo Riano

Evening Shore by Barbara Brown

Evening Shore by Barbara Brown

Night At Owachomo Bridge by John Foster

Night At Owachomo Bridge by John Foster

The Advance of  Light by James Neeley

The Advance of Light by James Neeley

Mobius Arch #6 by Inge Johnsson

Mobius Arch #6 by Inge Johnsson

La Salinas - Isle De Margarita by Rob Diffenderfer

La Salinas – Isle De Margarita by Rob Diffenderfer

Battery Point Lighthouse by Ken Dietz

Battery Point Lighthouse by Ken Dietz

The Forest Is Dreaming by Janel Kaufman

The Forest Is Dreaming by Janel Kaufman

Take You There by Janel Kaufman

Take You There by Janel Kaufman

 Toco Rock by Gregory Scott

Toco Rock by Gregory Scott

Toco Sunrise by Gregory Scott

Toco Sunrise by Gregory Scott

Last purple sky ~HDRI~ by RATEL JULIEN

Last purple sky ~HDRI~ by RATEL JULIEN

Summer sunset ~HDRI~ by RATEL JULIEN

Summer sunset ~HDRI~ by RATEL JULIEN

Zen Tree by Ben Ryan

Zen Tree by Ben Ryan

The Last Best Place by Janel Kaufman

The Last Best Place by Janel Kaufman

Home On The Range by Janel Kaufman

Home On The Range by Janel Kaufman

Post from: Digital Photography School – Photography Tips.

25 Oustanding Landscape Photos of Various Types on Imagekind
Nate Jelovich
Wed, 24 Feb 2010 14:07:29 GMT

Oct 022009
 

From Gizmodo.

 

Wildlife photographer Michael Nichols wanted to photograph a 300-foot-tall redwood in a dense forest with no clear lines of sight. So he built a custom camera rig to take tons of close-ups to stitch together.

The result is a stunning composite of 83 different shots of this incredible tree. Look for a huge foldout of the image in the October issue of National Geographic, and here’s a video of Nichols talking about the process of capturing the image.

Custom Camera Rig Allows For a Stunning Vertical Panorama of a Giant Redwood [Nature]
Adam Frucci
Thu, 01 Oct 2009 18:40:00 GMT